home cooked theory

How we became professional, part 2 – Managing without women

(…continued from part 1) 2. The emergence of time management manuals, from the 1970s to the present. As Boltanski and Chiapello show in the French context, management manuals are a useful archive to understand dominant registers of professional ambition and success. Over the past half-century in the US, popular versions of more formal instruction books […]

How we became professional, part 1 – Mayo’s missing women

Before joining Intel, I was planning a project on the history of professionalism. Specifically, I wanted to study genres of popular pedagogy devoted to teaching office workers self-management skills. I was interested in two areas, to be explored in the next series of posts: 1. The establishment of human relations as a discipline, particularly the […]

Notes from Michael Warner, ‘On Normativity’, May 15 2013

[All errors entirely mine. One of the smartest people I have ever heard talk. I could not keep up] Queer theory without normativity: part of a wider project with Robyn Wiegman and Elizabeth Wilson. Trying to provide a genealogy for grad students to show how normativity became the (limited) focus for queer theory. Quite a […]

Women and work in Australia – notes

The following notes and links are from reading Elizabeth Windschuttle (ed) Women, Class and History: Feminist Perspectives on Australia 1788-1978, Fontana Press, Melbourne, 1980 Ray Markey, ‘Women and Labour, 1880-1900′ (83- 111) Louisa Lawson – the Dawn Club: demanded economic and social equality (The Dawn newspaper now archived online thanks to this successful campaign; more […]

M/C Journal Special Issue: ‘Marriage’

If any of my intimacy students are reading…. here is your chance to be published! The question of what ‘marriage’ is, and what it is capable of becoming, has increasingly become a hot topic across many countries. In Australia, a key turning point occurred when the then Howard goverment amended the Marriage Act to explicitly […]

The problem with work (I)

Feminist calls for better work for women, as important as they have been, have on the whole resulted in more work for women. Beyond the intensification of many forms of waged work… the burdens of unwaged domestic and caring work have also increased, both because of the pressures of neoliberal restructuring along with the double […]

Commuter marriage

I have been reading a book from the early 1980s on ‘commuter marriage’. It stood out from the shelves in the library when I was preparing my course reader this year, and for obvious reasons I have an interest in the topic. What’s remarkable, reading it from the set of presumptions I have today, is […]

Adultery technologies and ‘intimacy’s work’

I haven’t posted much about my own research lately, even though I have been writing constantly since the new year (my aching arms can attest to this!). Much of the work is still under review, and needs time to breathe, or is the kind of writing that doesn’t circulate beyond specific audiences: thesis reports, peer […]

From teleology to topography: Kerryn Drysdale on auto-ethnographic encounters and the archive

I want to introduce this by recounting an experience I had at the beginning of my auto-ethnography. I was going regularly to Queer Central at the Sly Fox Hotel – one of my ethnographic sites – where drag king shows have been running for nine years. I would take along my notepad and try to […]

Postscript: Researching intimacy, sexuality and space

I have posted some pics from Friday’s workshop on Facebook and Flickr for those who couldn’t make it. This was a fantastic prelude to Saturday’s Queer Thinking… and Sara Ahmed’s amazing talk, “Wilful Queers: A Queer History of Will”. I am still a bit overwhelmed by the quality of presentations and the quantity of people […]

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  • @melgregg

    100 years of Hydro: something to add to your itinerary @feraldata? abc.net.au/news/2014-08-2…

    About 14 hours ago from Mel 's Twitter via Twitter Web Client

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